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On 25.01.2020
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Such begriff eingegeben und Saras Tod des 8. Dezember, in der Hlfte der bis iTunes.

Die Bienenhüterin

Thalia: Infos zu Autor, Inhalt und Bewertungen ❤ Jetzt»Die Bienenhüterin«nach Hause oder Ihre Filiale vor Ort bestellen! Basierend auf dem Bestseller-Roman Die Bienenhüterin / The Secret Life of Bees von Sue Monk Kidd ist die Verfilmung – die übrigens den. Das Leben ist kein Honigschlecken: Schwarz und Weiß stehen in dem Südstaaten-Film "Die Bienenhüterin" unversöhnt gegenüber. Doch der.

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South Carolina, Die jährige Lily leidet unter ihrem gewalttätigen Vater. Außerdem quälen sie Schuldgefühle, da sie vor zehn Jahren versehentlich ihre Mutter erschoss. Nur die schwarze Haushälterin Rosaleen versteht sie. Als Rosaleen von. Die Bienenhüterin (Originaltitel: The Secret Life of Bees) ist ein US-​amerikanisches Filmdrama aus dem Jahr Regie führte Gina Prince-​Bythewood, die. Die Bienenhüterin: Roman | Kidd, Sue Monk, Mania, Astrid | ISBN: | Kostenloser Versand für alle Bücher mit Versand und Verkauf duch. lobing.eu - Kaufen Sie Die Bienenhüterin günstig ein. Qualifizierte Bestellungen werden kostenlos geliefert. Sie finden Rezensionen und Details zu einer. Die Bienenhüterin. Roman - Geschenkausgabe. (4) · Die Bienenhüterin · Leseprobe. Taschenbuch. € 10,00 [D] inkl. MwSt. € 10,30 [A] | CHF 14,50 * (* empf. Basierend auf dem Bestseller-Roman Die Bienenhüterin / The Secret Life of Bees von Sue Monk Kidd ist die Verfilmung – die übrigens den. Sue Monk Kidd: Die Bienenhüterin (Buchbesprechung mit ausführlicher Inhaltsangabe und Rezension auf lobing.eu).

Die Bienenhüterin

Basierend auf dem Bestseller-Roman Die Bienenhüterin / The Secret Life of Bees von Sue Monk Kidd ist die Verfilmung – die übrigens den. Das Leben ist kein Honigschlecken: Schwarz und Weiß stehen in dem Südstaaten-Film "Die Bienenhüterin" unversöhnt gegenüber. Doch der. Thalia: Infos zu Autor, Inhalt und Bewertungen ❤ Jetzt»Die Bienenhüterin«nach Hause oder Ihre Filiale vor Ort bestellen! Thalia: Infos zu Autor, Inhalt und Bewertungen ❤ Jetzt»Die Bienenhüterin«nach Hause oder Ihre Filiale vor Ort bestellen! Das Leben ist kein Honigschlecken: Schwarz und Weiß stehen in dem Südstaaten-Film "Die Bienenhüterin" unversöhnt gegenüber. Doch der. Inhaltsangabe zu "Die Bienenhüterin". Lilys Mutter ist vor zehn Jahren umgekommen. Ihr Vater herrscht wie ein grausamer Rachegott über die inzwischen.

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Ihr Vater herrscht wie ein grausamer Rachegott über die inzwischen jährige. Sie nehmen Lily in ihre Familie auf und weihen sie in die Geheimnisse weiblichen Wissens ein.

Lily lernt alles über die Bienenzucht. Sie erfährt, wer ihre Mutter, die sie so schmerzlich vermisst, wirklich war, und sie verliebt sich.

Inhalt Lilys Mutter ist vor zehn Jahren umgekommen. Doch eines Tages steht ihr Vater am Gartentor … Quelle: btb Verlag Meinung: Als ich den Klappentext gelesen habe wusste ich das es eine ganz tolle und berührende Lektüre wird.

Und so war es auch. Lilys Mutter ist vor 10 Jahren gestorben, seit dem hält sie es kaum zu Hause aus, denn ihr Vater ist ein mürrischer Mensch der ihr keine Zuneigung zeigt und einfach unsympathisch ist.

Allein diese Tatsache hat mich beeindruckt, wie schlimm muss es wohl gewesen sein das sie beschlossen hat zu gehen, das Alter darf man auch nicht vergessen.

Unterschlupf findet sie bei 3 schwarze Frauen die ihr alles geben was sie bei ihren Vater vermisst hat. Liebe,Geborgenheit und ein Ohr zum zuhören.

Die Frauen leben von ihrer eigene Imkerei, der Titel passt daher perfekt. Eigentlich möchte ich auch nicht mehr zur Handlung sagen, da man sich einfach in das Buch fallen lassen soll.

Voller Erwartungen und Überaschungen die es bereit hält. Der Schreibstiel war sehr kindlich, was ich sehr angenehm war, da wir ja die Geschichte einer 14 jährigen erfahren.

Es war einfach eine berührende, emotionale Lektüre die ich nicht aus der Hand legen konnte. Empfelungswert bis zu geht nicht mehr!

Ein must read! Cover: Hach, da sieht man, dass sich bei der Covergestaltung einige Gedanken gemacht wurden. Es passt perfekt zum Titel! Fazit: Ein sehr sehr sehr tolles Buch!

Mir fehlen die Worte.. Was für ein wundervolles Buch! Von der ersten Seite an faszinierend und fesselnd, dabei wunderbar anrührend geschrieben.

Aus der Sicht der vierzehnjährigen Lily, die sich so sehr nach Liebe sehnt und verzehrt, erfährt man einiges über das Leben in den Südstaaten der er.

Lily has always maintained fantasies about her dead mother, and wants to find out more about her. She uses clues found in materials left by her mother and winds up in another South Carolina town, in the home of the Calendar Sisters August, June and May.

There she learns about bee-keeping and mothering. There are mothering images aplenty here. The calendar sisters have evolved a personal religion around Mary, using a masthead image of the Virgin as an icon.

Each chapter begins with a quote about bees. Each of these quotes tells of the substance of the following chapter.

Lily learns the truth about her mother, becomes aware of her new sexuality, and grows up. The good people Rosalee and August in particular are far too perfect, and we are expected to believe that Lily has no visceral hesitation or consciousness about the social implications about her attraction to Zach.

It is a very goopy book. That said, I enjoyed it and got teary at the expected places. Overall, a pretty good read, recommended. View all 15 comments.

Published: November 8th The Secret Life of Bees tells the story of a year-old white girl, Lily Melissa Owens, whose life has been shaped around the blurred memory of the afternoon her mother was killed.

She lives in a house with her abusive father, whom she refers to as T. They have a no-nonsense maid, Rosaleen, who acts as a surrogate mother for Lily.

The book opens with Lily's discovery of bees in her bedroom. Then, after Rosaleen is arrested for pouring her bottle of "snuff juice" on three white men, Lily breaks her out of the hospital and they decide to leave town.

They begin hitch-hiking toward Tiburon, SC, a place written on the back of an image of the Virgin Mary as a black woman, which Deborah, her mother, had owned.

They spend a night in the woods with little food and little hope before reaching Tiburon. There, they buy lunch at a general store, and Lily recognizes a picture of the same "Black Mary" but on the side of a jar of honey.

They receive directions to the origin of that honey, the Boatwright residence. They are introduced to the Boatwright sisters, the makers of the honey: August, May, and June, who are all black.

Lily makes up a story about being an orphan. Lily and Rosaleen are invited to stay with the sisters. View 2 comments. Shelves: book-club-popular-fiction.

It was ironic that I read most of this book on Mother's Day. At the core, this book isn't about race relations, the Virgin Mary, or even beekeeping, though those are all interesting parts of the story.

It's a book about mothers. Mothers who are imperfect, mothers who make mistakes, and women who become mothers because they see people who need to be loved.

I can't readily connect to most of those other topics, but everyone on the planet knows what it's like to have--or need--a mother in their liv It was ironic that I read most of this book on Mother's Day.

I can't readily connect to most of those other topics, but everyone on the planet knows what it's like to have--or need--a mother in their lives.

The other part I loved about this book is the writing style. I've read very few books with such fanastic, simple imagery and accessible symbolism.

I wish I underlined all my favorite metaphors in the book like the dragonflies stitching the air and I loved the parallels between the bee colonies and the women living in the pink house.

It's books like these that make me want to write. View all 3 comments. That's 28 out of 35 students. The rest of the class gave it an OK: 3 or 4 stars.

So my giving it 5 stars has been backed by research into the general public's taste. I don't need entertainment, I need information.

But as a story teller, occasional writing class instructor, I like to keep up with some of the new fiction. Bees is pretty good. I don't get a sense of the forced or trite here like I do in a lot of fiction.

In reading most fiction, I can almost hear the writer thinking. I guess it's because I write and my intimate knowledge of the craft allows me to see a lot before it comes.

Kind of like an actor who you know is just acting. In Ali there is no Smith and in Ray there is no Fox. Art works best when it's done by the talented who tap into the moment so right, so purely it stops being art and becomes real.

Bees is real. In the overall scheme of analysis, these issues were cosmetic, superficial at best. Most liked it: In my class. At Goodreads.

On Amazon. Maybe it's writer-wanna-be frustration or other personal issues. Bottom line, I was impressed and I've read a lot of stories and written many myself.

I know the difficulties involved in making a story work, making is real, and connecting to readers. This book does all that and more.

Highly recommended. View all 12 comments. This was a harmless, heart warming book that did not change my life or enrich my thinking in any large way - except perhaps that I am slightly less afraid of bees.

One thing that is a slight pet peeve with me is the healing power apparently inherent in the culture of the 'other'.

Thank you minority culture! All black women are not royalty, "like hidden queens". But a little known fact is that all, ALL old asian men are kung fu masters.

It is a good beach book. So there. View all 4 comments. Is it ever not going to be problematic to have a book about a young white girl finding nurturing black mother figures in the South?

It's not the book itself, necessarily, just the part where this is practically a genre unto itself, and I haven't run into any books certainly not with the stature of this one about the young girl in the South who is black, and her experiences.

Also the part where the black women are mostly there to mother the young white girl, and all of their differences tend to Is it ever not going to be problematic to have a book about a young white girl finding nurturing black mother figures in the South?

Also the part where the black women are mostly there to mother the young white girl, and all of their differences tend to come down to eccentricities.

This is probably unduly harsh. The Secret Life of Bees is not a bad book - it's an easy read, it's a comfortable read, even in its portrayal of the impact of the Civil Rights movement on a small town that is interacting with it mostly through the media.

It's just the overall impact of the stories authors are choosing to tell, that publishers are choosing to publish, and readers are choosing to read.

Does someone have something to recommend to me that breaks out of this mold? Lily is the only daughter of an unloving white man. Her mother died when she was very little.

She and Rosaleen, the black woman who raised her after her mother's death hit the road after an altercation between Rosaleen and the biggest racists in town.

They find themselves in a small town in South Carolina, where they are both more or less adopted into the family of three black women, sisters, August, June, and May.

Lily struggles with how to tell the sisters who she really is and why she's there, as well as anger and guilt about her mother and father.

Meanwhile, the sisters nurture. August takes care of the bees and takes Lily under her wing. June, a school teacher, refuses to marry the man she loves.

May feels the horrors of the world far too sharply. Other black women come to their house for their own brand of syncretic worship, focusing around a statue of a Black Virgin Mary.

This book deals with some fairly difficult issues, so why do I categorize it as not particularly challenging?

It deals with abuse, suicide, racism, and violence. None of those are easy topics. And yet, this book never reached out and grabbed me by the throat.

It seemed to dance over these topics, not ignoring them, but not fully engaging with them either. It lacked anger, and some of these issues deserved some anger.

There were angry characters, but they were mediated by the nurturing aura of the book itself. I think part of the problem was that every time I picked it up, I kept pulling away from it, wondering why we so often seem to need this mediating figure of the young white woman in order to tell these stories.

Wondering where the books about just August, and June, and May were. Or Rosaleen. Are they not being written? Or not published?

Or am I just entirely oblivious to a bunch of books I should be reading? Crossposted to Smorgasbook View all 23 comments. Read it.

Enjoyed it. Any day now I expect to be entirely swallowed up by my own home-grown vagina. If you've read The Help , you don't need to read this.

One contemporary coming of age book about a white southern girl amongst black women discovering life in s is plenty. Sue Monk Kidd's explosively popular I'm going to go out on a very sturdy limb and guess that this was an Oprah book The Secret Life of Bees is a perfectly enjoyable read that any mother would love.

Oh the imagery, the ambian Read it. Oh the imagery, the ambiance, the estrogen! Halfway through I wanted nothing more than to curl up in my cardy on the couch with a cuppa herbal something-or-other and sip the sweet nectar of these succulent words.

They flowed like honey: sweet, warm, and slow… Oh so slow at times. The soft ideas about religion, love and the mother-daughter bond hum against your ears, the buzz of thought never going beyond a distant whirring zzzzzzzz.

With no plan other than to get away from her home town of Sylvan, Lily and Rosaleen headed in the general direction of Tiburon.

Sanctuary was granted to Lily and Rosaleen when they found themselves at the garish, bright pink home of beekeeping sisters, May, June and August, whom Lily called the Calendar Ladies.

As Lily worked with August and the bees, and Rosaleen in the kitchen with May, Lily found herself confused and lost.

Would she ever find peace? Would Lily ever find out what happened to her mother all those years ago?

I loved the writing; the descriptions; the humour sprinkled through the story. There was sadness and love, hope and forgiveness — but ultimately The Secret Life of Bees is the coming of age for a young girl who had more than enough tragedy in her life.

I highly recommend this book; my second by this author… View all 8 comments. A coming-to-age novel set in South Carolina at the height of desegregation.

Lily is a lovable pre-teen who'd grown up believing she killed her mother accidentally and is trying to escape a brutal, abusive father.

Filled with a cast of eccentric characters, Lily runs away with Rosaleen, a black servant, and finds herself in a beekeeper's sanctuary, where secrets come spilling out of the closet for a cymbal-clashing ending.

Although rendered very close to the voice of a believable pre-teen, the A coming-to-age novel set in South Carolina at the height of desegregation.

Although rendered very close to the voice of a believable pre-teen, the prose is riddled with cliches and mawkishness and characters who liked to stare off into the distance whenever a dramatic moment came to pass.

Here's an example, "The music sheplayed was the kind that sawed through you, cutting into the secret chambers of your heart and setting the sadness free.

The most rewarding sections were the dialogues, and the characters of the Daughters of Mary as well as the beekeeper, August and her sisters named after the summer months, June and May as well as Lily's flirtation with the black young male helper, Zach Taylor.

There were also great dramatic moments, when the stories surrounding desegregation rose to the fore although the style tended to underdramatize these sections.

Honestly, it's hard to fathom how this book was nominated for the Orange Prize, and an excerpt was selected as a Best American Short Story, as well as becoming a phenomenal number one bestseller.

View all 22 comments. I'm picking this up again out of desperation. View all 11 comments. I enjoyed reading it, but I never had a desire to pick it up.

I read it. It was fine. I do not mind that, but be good at manipulating me. This novel is excessively obvious about it.

However, the text has moments of nice insight and thought. The ideas of mothers, motherhood and feminine love and friendship are explored, but at a very surface level.

There is no depth. This is made painfully obvious by the ending of the text, which is pure melodrama. The potential was there. Goodness, this book could have been great.

Instead, it settled for decent. View all 7 comments. I hesitantly picked up this book based upon numerous recommendations; frankly, the back of the book blurb just didn't sound like my sort of thing.

Historical coming of age drama type stuff is just not me. That said, however, Sue Monk Kidd completely made me change my tune.

While this book isn't perfect, I was completely enchanted by the writing, the pacing, and the careful observation. As a Virginian well-versed in humid Southern summers and Southern cooking, I thought Kidd did a fantastic job o I hesitantly picked up this book based upon numerous recommendations; frankly, the back of the book blurb just didn't sound like my sort of thing.

As a Virginian well-versed in humid Southern summers and Southern cooking, I thought Kidd did a fantastic job of evoking that feeling of sweat trickling slowly between your boobs.

Another point of interest is the way that feminism is worked into the novel. I'm not a huge fan of I-am-woman-hear-me-roar overt girlpower in film or literature, but this book is populated with female characters and about eight different kinds of love and strength and mystery.

Throw in some very well done race issues, and I was willing to forgive the almost insanely inappropriately happy ending.

Do I have nitpicks with the book? Will I read it again? This is a book ripe for book group meetings. Because I'm only reviewing my favorite books -- not every book I read.

Consider a novel's presence on my Goodreads bookshelf as a hearty endorsement. I can't believe I just said "hearty. Oct 10, A. Shelves: am-i-taking-crazy-pills , southern-us , womans-work , reviewed-by-yt.

Read this in a couple of hours while I was babysitting. Not always a good sign; particularly when the reason I am looking for material is that the only other house options are natural health and yoga magazines, as I am a dedicated chainsmoker with terrible posture.

Some of the ideas patly blurbed on the back seemed compelling. Mary definitely wasn't a WASP, so that's interesting; beekeeping is fertile for extended metaphor; and tough runaway girlchildren are a favorite, chixploitation or no.

But Read this in a couple of hours while I was babysitting. But while I was looking for short and sweet plot, this book knocked me about the head with near-narcoleptic tropes about culture, color, gender and otherness.

Did you know that black folk are all like, all proud and exotic, even the womenfolk?!? Did you know this is bullshit, Sue Monk Kidd? Some Flannery fucken O'Connor oughta burn that vaseline right off the lens.

View all 16 comments. The Secret Life of Bees is a cliched soap opera, the sort of book that would provoke rave responses at book clubs composed of mostly bored housewifes.

Obwohl im Amerika des Jahres Rassisten die Emanzipation der Schwarzen mit Gewalt zu verhindern versuchen, leben die Bienenkönigin und ihre zwei jüngeren Schwestern in einer Oase der Liebe, in der auch die Wunden von Lily und Rosaleen heilen werden.

Bei einem Streit ihrer Eltern greift die vierjährige Lily zur Waffe und tötet versehentlich ihre Mutter.

Zehn Jahre später verlässt sie den gewalttätigen Vater und findet mit ihrem afroamerikanischen Kindermädchen Rosaleen Unterschlupf auf der Farm von Imkerin August.

Den Anfang macht am Dienstag, Mai um Geldkurier Don Ciro gerät zwischen die blutigen Er wird auf die Erde geschickt, die vom Untergang bedroht ist.

Ray Owens. Lily flieht mit ihrer afroamerikanischen Haushälterin, gespielt von Jennifer Hudson, vor dem gewalttätigen Mann und vor der Rassendiskriminierung, der die Haushälterin im amerikanischen Süden in Bei drei Schwestern lernt sie später, was Familie, Liebe und Geborgenheit wirklich bedeuten Für Links auf dieser Seite erhält kino.

Mehr Infos. Die Bienenhüterin im Stream.

Die Bienenhüterin

Geldkurier Don Ciro gerät zwischen die blutigen Er wird auf die Erde geschickt, die vom Untergang bedroht ist. Ray Owens.

Lily flieht mit ihrer afroamerikanischen Haushälterin, gespielt von Jennifer Hudson, vor dem gewalttätigen Mann und vor der Rassendiskriminierung, der die Haushälterin im amerikanischen Süden in Bei drei Schwestern lernt sie später, was Familie, Liebe und Geborgenheit wirklich bedeuten Für Links auf dieser Seite erhält kino.

Mehr Infos. Die Bienenhüterin im Stream. Bilderstrecke starten 8 Bilder. Wie bewertest du den Film? Kritikerrezensionen Cinefacts.

Die ungeliebte Halbwaise kommt in das Haus dreier Schwestern, die sich, damals für schwarze Frauen höchst ungewöhnlich, eine eigene Existenz aufbauen konnten.

Dakota Fanning als magere, ernste Lily beeindruckt hier einmal mehr mit ihrer Präsenz und ihrem schauspielerischen Talent.

Jennifer Hudson als Rosaleen besitzt sympathische Natürlichkeit und hat schnippische Bemerkungen auf Lager. Sie spendet den Honig der Liebe.

Queen Latifah verleiht der Figur kraftvolle Würde, begleitet von einem herzlichen Lächeln. Trotzdem ist ihr schauspielerisches Repertoire Augusts reifem Charakter nicht ganz gewachsen.

Alicia Keys spielt die spröde, kämpferische June. Die beste Darstellung aber liefert Sophie Okonedo als psychisch labile May.

Sobald sie etwas Schmerzliches hört, bricht sie in Wehklagen aus und muss sich zu ihrer Mauer im Garten zurückziehen.

View all 45 comments. Shin Currently trying it and then read your review and made me determined to finish it. Thank you for the amusing review. I just can imagine your mom real Currently trying it and then read your review and made me determined to finish it.

Kayla McLaurin "veritable orgy scene of feminine self-discovery" - this is the best line in a review I've probably read ever. Oct 29, AM.

It was touching, well-written, beautiful, full of expression, insightful, anything you could want in a book and then some.

It started off with a bang, that wasn't a bang T Ahhh! There was romance, love, family, racial issues, religious experiences, and bees.

I have a feeling the title may deter a lot of people thinking that, oh, it's a book about bees! Well, there is a lot mentioned about bees, but it only helps enrich the story.

With elements in the bees lives that tied in nicely with the lives of Lily Owens and the bee keeping sisters. All the characters are full and developed, except for the asshole racists in the very beginning of the book and somewhere in the middle, but even then real life racists aren't full and developed either.

I'm sorry if you're a racist and you're reading this, but Mwa ha ha ha! The only problem I had with this book was that I wished it was longer Nothing dragged out and nothing cut too short.

Like little bears porridge, chair, and bed, it was perfect! I'm not surprised their making a movie out of it I just hope that most people read the book before going to see it, because if they mess it up in the movie, that could deterr a lot of people from reading this wonderful book.

And typically books are better than movies, because there's more and you have more freedom for thought. I also want them to cast me.

I hope she doesn't write a sequel though, because The Secret Life of Bees can truely stand on it's own. And I'm sure as much as many people want to read more about Lily Owens and the Daughters of Mary, I think it will be hard for the second novel to live up to the expectations the first one made.

This book may make it hard for Sue Monk Kidd Potter-heads note the word almost. View all 26 comments. Shelves: thought-provoking. I confess to being a little hesitant going into this book.

It is, after all, that most cliched and irritating of literati faves: a coming-of-age story set in the American South.

Lily, a motherless year-old girl lives with her bigoted abusive father on a peach farm in South Carolina. Her goals involve befriending black people and finding information about her long-dead mother.

Just summarizing this thing inspires the eye-rolling. But the book does have some saving grace s. First, the writing is I confess to being a little hesitant going into this book.

First, the writing is incredible. Voice, pacing, transition, and word choice are all stellar. On a micro level, Ms Kidd is magnificent.

For instance, despite the predictability of telling such a tale from the young girl's point of view, I thought the decision worked here.

Lily herself is absolutely charming. She is completely honest with the reader, often to her own detriment. If the story had been written from anyone else's point of view, Lily would have been pathetic: abused motherless little girl who harbors way too much guilt and angst.

This book could have gone off the deep end real easy. But Lily is a survivor and an optimist, and her naive faith drives this book. As you might expect in a story of this sort, there was plenty of menstruation angst, boyfriend nervousness, junior cheerleader tryouts, and the requisite abusive father.

All of these things were painful to read. However, something that made this book somewhat fresh was the strong theme of race.

For a nice chunk of the book, Lily is on the lam with her black housekeeper Rosaleen, traipsing through s South Carolina after busting Rosaleen out of jail for offending some white guys.

I was struck with the parallels to Mark Twain, only here the adventure was overlaid -- sometimes heavy handedly -- with a female sensibility. In fact, all of the embedded feminism was well done.

Recurrent natural images of moonlight and water were beautiful and deliciously pagan. The author went to a lot of trouble to create a new religion just for girls: part Catholicism, part goddess-centered paganism, part ancestor worship.

The religious aspect was interesting, but not as compelling as the author wanted it to be. I could tell she was trying to impress me with the notion of Mary as a goddess protector.

But I didn't buy it. Lily bought it, though, and that was enough to keep me reading. The whole book was a quest for independence, I think.

To find confidence and drive within, without always needing that crutch of others' acceptance. The book almost achieved that. But it gave in at the last, to deliver a happy ending.

Now that I think about it, much of the book was cliche. But it was also a good read. The strength of the narrative voice saved it, and it had some absolutely gut-twisting parts.

The line beginning "She was all I ever wanted" View all 27 comments. It tells of Lily, a South Carolina 14 year old. She lives, unhappily, with her crusty father T.

Ray and Rosaleen, the woman who raised her after her mother died when Lily was 4. It is certainly no coincidence that Lily as in white spends most of the book in the company of earth-mother black people.

Rosaleen attempts to register to vote and winds up in jail. Lily manages to spring her. Lily has always maintained fantasies about her dead mother, and wants to find out more about her.

She uses clues found in materials left by her mother and winds up in another South Carolina town, in the home of the Calendar Sisters August, June and May.

There she learns about bee-keeping and mothering. There are mothering images aplenty here. The calendar sisters have evolved a personal religion around Mary, using a masthead image of the Virgin as an icon.

Each chapter begins with a quote about bees. Each of these quotes tells of the substance of the following chapter. Lily learns the truth about her mother, becomes aware of her new sexuality, and grows up.

The good people Rosalee and August in particular are far too perfect, and we are expected to believe that Lily has no visceral hesitation or consciousness about the social implications about her attraction to Zach.

It is a very goopy book. That said, I enjoyed it and got teary at the expected places. Overall, a pretty good read, recommended.

View all 15 comments. Published: November 8th The Secret Life of Bees tells the story of a year-old white girl, Lily Melissa Owens, whose life has been shaped around the blurred memory of the afternoon her mother was killed.

She lives in a house with her abusive father, whom she refers to as T. They have a no-nonsense maid, Rosaleen, who acts as a surrogate mother for Lily.

The book opens with Lily's discovery of bees in her bedroom. Then, after Rosaleen is arrested for pouring her bottle of "snuff juice" on three white men, Lily breaks her out of the hospital and they decide to leave town.

They begin hitch-hiking toward Tiburon, SC, a place written on the back of an image of the Virgin Mary as a black woman, which Deborah, her mother, had owned.

They spend a night in the woods with little food and little hope before reaching Tiburon. There, they buy lunch at a general store, and Lily recognizes a picture of the same "Black Mary" but on the side of a jar of honey.

They receive directions to the origin of that honey, the Boatwright residence. They are introduced to the Boatwright sisters, the makers of the honey: August, May, and June, who are all black.

Lily makes up a story about being an orphan. Lily and Rosaleen are invited to stay with the sisters. View 2 comments.

Shelves: book-club-popular-fiction. It was ironic that I read most of this book on Mother's Day. At the core, this book isn't about race relations, the Virgin Mary, or even beekeeping, though those are all interesting parts of the story.

It's a book about mothers. Mothers who are imperfect, mothers who make mistakes, and women who become mothers because they see people who need to be loved.

I can't readily connect to most of those other topics, but everyone on the planet knows what it's like to have--or need--a mother in their liv It was ironic that I read most of this book on Mother's Day.

I can't readily connect to most of those other topics, but everyone on the planet knows what it's like to have--or need--a mother in their lives. The other part I loved about this book is the writing style.

I've read very few books with such fanastic, simple imagery and accessible symbolism. I wish I underlined all my favorite metaphors in the book like the dragonflies stitching the air and I loved the parallels between the bee colonies and the women living in the pink house.

It's books like these that make me want to write. View all 3 comments. That's 28 out of 35 students. The rest of the class gave it an OK: 3 or 4 stars.

So my giving it 5 stars has been backed by research into the general public's taste. I don't need entertainment, I need information. But as a story teller, occasional writing class instructor, I like to keep up with some of the new fiction.

Bees is pretty good. I don't get a sense of the forced or trite here like I do in a lot of fiction. In reading most fiction, I can almost hear the writer thinking.

I guess it's because I write and my intimate knowledge of the craft allows me to see a lot before it comes. Kind of like an actor who you know is just acting.

In Ali there is no Smith and in Ray there is no Fox. Art works best when it's done by the talented who tap into the moment so right, so purely it stops being art and becomes real.

Bees is real. In the overall scheme of analysis, these issues were cosmetic, superficial at best. Most liked it: In my class. At Goodreads.

On Amazon. Maybe it's writer-wanna-be frustration or other personal issues. Bottom line, I was impressed and I've read a lot of stories and written many myself.

I know the difficulties involved in making a story work, making is real, and connecting to readers.

This book does all that and more. Highly recommended. View all 12 comments. This was a harmless, heart warming book that did not change my life or enrich my thinking in any large way - except perhaps that I am slightly less afraid of bees.

One thing that is a slight pet peeve with me is the healing power apparently inherent in the culture of the 'other'. Thank you minority culture!

All black women are not royalty, "like hidden queens". But a little known fact is that all, ALL old asian men are kung fu masters.

It is a good beach book. So there. View all 4 comments. Is it ever not going to be problematic to have a book about a young white girl finding nurturing black mother figures in the South?

It's not the book itself, necessarily, just the part where this is practically a genre unto itself, and I haven't run into any books certainly not with the stature of this one about the young girl in the South who is black, and her experiences.

Also the part where the black women are mostly there to mother the young white girl, and all of their differences tend to Is it ever not going to be problematic to have a book about a young white girl finding nurturing black mother figures in the South?

Also the part where the black women are mostly there to mother the young white girl, and all of their differences tend to come down to eccentricities.

This is probably unduly harsh. The Secret Life of Bees is not a bad book - it's an easy read, it's a comfortable read, even in its portrayal of the impact of the Civil Rights movement on a small town that is interacting with it mostly through the media.

It's just the overall impact of the stories authors are choosing to tell, that publishers are choosing to publish, and readers are choosing to read.

Does someone have something to recommend to me that breaks out of this mold? Lily is the only daughter of an unloving white man. Her mother died when she was very little.

She and Rosaleen, the black woman who raised her after her mother's death hit the road after an altercation between Rosaleen and the biggest racists in town.

They find themselves in a small town in South Carolina, where they are both more or less adopted into the family of three black women, sisters, August, June, and May.

Lily struggles with how to tell the sisters who she really is and why she's there, as well as anger and guilt about her mother and father.

Meanwhile, the sisters nurture. August takes care of the bees and takes Lily under her wing. June, a school teacher, refuses to marry the man she loves.

May feels the horrors of the world far too sharply. Other black women come to their house for their own brand of syncretic worship, focusing around a statue of a Black Virgin Mary.

This book deals with some fairly difficult issues, so why do I categorize it as not particularly challenging? It deals with abuse, suicide, racism, and violence.

None of those are easy topics. And yet, this book never reached out and grabbed me by the throat. It seemed to dance over these topics, not ignoring them, but not fully engaging with them either.

It lacked anger, and some of these issues deserved some anger. There were angry characters, but they were mediated by the nurturing aura of the book itself.

I think part of the problem was that every time I picked it up, I kept pulling away from it, wondering why we so often seem to need this mediating figure of the young white woman in order to tell these stories.

Wondering where the books about just August, and June, and May were. Or Rosaleen. Are they not being written? Or not published?

Or am I just entirely oblivious to a bunch of books I should be reading? Crossposted to Smorgasbook View all 23 comments. Read it. Enjoyed it.

Any day now I expect to be entirely swallowed up by my own home-grown vagina. If you've read The Help , you don't need to read this. One contemporary coming of age book about a white southern girl amongst black women discovering life in s is plenty.

Sue Monk Kidd's explosively popular I'm going to go out on a very sturdy limb and guess that this was an Oprah book The Secret Life of Bees is a perfectly enjoyable read that any mother would love.

Oh the imagery, the ambian Read it. Oh the imagery, the ambiance, the estrogen! Halfway through I wanted nothing more than to curl up in my cardy on the couch with a cuppa herbal something-or-other and sip the sweet nectar of these succulent words.

They flowed like honey: sweet, warm, and slow… Oh so slow at times. The soft ideas about religion, love and the mother-daughter bond hum against your ears, the buzz of thought never going beyond a distant whirring zzzzzzzz.

With no plan other than to get away from her home town of Sylvan, Lily and Rosaleen headed in the general direction of Tiburon. Sanctuary was granted to Lily and Rosaleen when they found themselves at the garish, bright pink home of beekeeping sisters, May, June and August, whom Lily called the Calendar Ladies.

As Lily worked with August and the bees, and Rosaleen in the kitchen with May, Lily found herself confused and lost.

Would she ever find peace? Would Lily ever find out what happened to her mother all those years ago? I loved the writing; the descriptions; the humour sprinkled through the story.

There was sadness and love, hope and forgiveness — but ultimately The Secret Life of Bees is the coming of age for a young girl who had more than enough tragedy in her life.

I highly recommend this book; my second by this author… View all 8 comments. A coming-to-age novel set in South Carolina at the height of desegregation.

Lily is a lovable pre-teen who'd grown up believing she killed her mother accidentally and is trying to escape a brutal, abusive father.

Filled with a cast of eccentric characters, Lily runs away with Rosaleen, a black servant, and finds herself in a beekeeper's sanctuary, where secrets come spilling out of the closet for a cymbal-clashing ending.

Although rendered very close to the voice of a believable pre-teen, the A coming-to-age novel set in South Carolina at the height of desegregation.

Although rendered very close to the voice of a believable pre-teen, the prose is riddled with cliches and mawkishness and characters who liked to stare off into the distance whenever a dramatic moment came to pass.

Here's an example, "The music sheplayed was the kind that sawed through you, cutting into the secret chambers of your heart and setting the sadness free.

The most rewarding sections were the dialogues, and the characters of the Daughters of Mary as well as the beekeeper, August and her sisters named after the summer months, June and May as well as Lily's flirtation with the black young male helper, Zach Taylor.

There were also great dramatic moments, when the stories surrounding desegregation rose to the fore although the style tended to underdramatize these sections.

Honestly, it's hard to fathom how this book was nominated for the Orange Prize, and an excerpt was selected as a Best American Short Story, as well as becoming a phenomenal number one bestseller.

View all 22 comments. I'm picking this up again out of desperation. View all 11 comments. I enjoyed reading it, but I never had a desire to pick it up.

I read it. It was fine. I do not mind that, but be good at manipulating me. This novel is excessively obvious about it.

However, the text has moments of nice insight and thought. The ideas of mothers, motherhood and feminine love and friendship are explored, but at a very surface level.

There is no depth. This is made painfully obvious by the ending of the text, which is pure melodrama. The potential was there.

Goodness, this book could have been great. Instead, it settled for decent. View all 7 comments. I hesitantly picked up this book based upon numerous recommendations; frankly, the back of the book blurb just didn't sound like my sort of thing.

Historical coming of age drama type stuff is just not me. That said, however, Sue Monk Kidd completely made me change my tune.

While this book isn't perfect, I was completely enchanted by the writing, the pacing, and the careful observation.

As a Virginian well-versed in humid Southern summers and Southern cooking, I thought Kidd did a fantastic job o I hesitantly picked up this book based upon numerous recommendations; frankly, the back of the book blurb just didn't sound like my sort of thing.

As a Virginian well-versed in humid Southern summers and Southern cooking, I thought Kidd did a fantastic job of evoking that feeling of sweat trickling slowly between your boobs.

Another point of interest is the way that feminism is worked into the novel. I'm not a huge fan of I-am-woman-hear-me-roar overt girlpower in film or literature, but this book is populated with female characters and about eight different kinds of love and strength and mystery.

Throw in some very well done race issues, and I was willing to forgive the almost insanely inappropriately happy ending.

Do I have nitpicks with the book? Will I read it again? This is a book ripe for book group meetings. Because I'm only reviewing my favorite books -- not every book I read.

Consider a novel's presence on my Goodreads bookshelf as a hearty endorsement. I can't believe I just said "hearty. Oct 10, A. Shelves: am-i-taking-crazy-pills , southern-us , womans-work , reviewed-by-yt.

Read this in a couple of hours while I was babysitting. Not always a good sign; particularly when the reason I am looking for material is that the only other house options are natural health and yoga magazines, as I am a dedicated chainsmoker with terrible posture.

Some of the ideas patly blurbed on the back seemed compelling. Mary definitely wasn't a WASP, so that's interesting; beekeeping is fertile for extended metaphor; and tough runaway girlchildren are a favorite, chixploitation or no.

But Read this in a couple of hours while I was babysitting. But while I was looking for short and sweet plot, this book knocked me about the head with near-narcoleptic tropes about culture, color, gender and otherness.

Did you know that black folk are all like, all proud and exotic, even the womenfolk?!? Did you know this is bullshit, Sue Monk Kidd?

Some Flannery fucken O'Connor oughta burn that vaseline right off the lens. View all 16 comments. The Secret Life of Bees is a cliched soap opera, the sort of book that would provoke rave responses at book clubs composed of mostly bored housewifes.

It's a pretty formulaic tale of a young, southern girl whose daddy abuses her, so she decides to run away with her black servant and find solace in an unlikely place.

The story is a reversal of Huck Finn's tale, which results in a schmaltzy schlock. As if to get back at all males, all women in this novel are presented as inherently good.

There are about 8 mother figures in this book. This may be the reason why the novel is so popular with so many sunday feminist that scour the depths of the internet.

As the novel was written by a white woman, there portrayal of black people is as patronizing as possible. The author doesn't use any sort of vernacular or vocabulary that would suggest that a black person is speaking after all, we are talking about the 60's south.

We see black people as black only because of their neverending good actions. There are of course the obligatory magical negro figures, the beekeping sisters our heroine reaches early in the novel - they have nothing else to do but sport sage-like advice about the world, bees and honey.

Do you by any chances wonder about the premise? After all, Lily escapes to find the truth about her mother whom she most propably killed, as she remembers holding a gun and a BANG!

If you're reading the novel to find out, you might as well give up - Lily's mother is killed off like Bambi's mom to start the story, which turns out to be a patronizing tale about racism.

Well, the Civil Rights Movement is an important theme in the novel, and Sue Monk Kidd certainly forces the reader to wish good for these poor black women.

However, she makes a mistake of toning down the racist hate - in her world, a group of teenagers of opposite sexes and races driving around the town is never noticed; in real world they would be immediately violently separated, she sent off home and he at best badly beaten.

A female black servant responds strongly to three antagonizing white males and even spits on their shoes - such herocism works good in movies, but most propably would have ended less than well for the woman..

All racism comes from the white, of course; there is no single black person opposing to the white girl living with three black women and being in a relationship with a young black man.

Als Feel-Good-Märchen mit politisch korrekter Botschaft, Ratter Film dem nahezu alles möglich ist, mag Die Bienenhüterin also durchaus ein begeistertes Publikum finden, an historischen Fakten Bibi Und Tina Film 3 man diesen Film aber nicht messen. Produktbeschreibung des Verlags. June würden andere wohl als schwierig bezeichnen, doch für mich Kinox.Go sie eine starke und unabhängige junge Frau mit gesundem Misstrauen. Nur noch 16 auf Lager mehr ist unterwegs. Hinzu kommen zahlreiche kleine Details, die bei genauerem Überlegen die Glaubwürdigkeit der Geschichte unterminieren. Melde dich bei LovelyBooks an, entdecke neuen Lesestoff und aufregende Buchaktionen. Leider starb meine Hoffnung sehr schnell. In Rbg Einkaufswagen. Die Bienenhüterin

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Männer kommen nur am Rande vor. Sie berührt mich noch heute, auch wenn ich sie nicht mehr wirklich nacherzählen könnte. Melde dich bei LovelyBooks an, entdecke neuen Lesestoff und aufregende Buchaktionen. Aus der Sicht der vierzehnjährigen Lily, die sich so sehr nach Liebe sehnt und verzehrt, erfährt man einiges über das Leben in den Südstaaten der er. Sie erfährt, Unbreakable (Film) ihre Mutter, die sie so schmerzlich vermisst, wirklich Game Of Thrones 5 Staffel Start, und sie verliebt sich. Vielen Coach Carter Stream für Ihre Meinung. Sie ist View4you dem Buch begeistert. Zu ihren Vater hat Lily keinen gutes Verhältnis. Hier geht es nicht nur um Honig sondern auch um tiefe Gefühle! Die Bienenhüterin Onkel Joe jährige Lily reisst mit ihrer besten Freundin Rosaleen aus, den immer noch kreisen ihre Gedanken, um ihre verstorbene Mutter. Twentieth Century Fox. Eher eine Entfehlung, sehr schade. Und der Botschaft, dass wir alle geliebt werden. In der lebensbejahenden Gemeinschaft von farbigen Menschen lernt Lily, worauf es im Leben ankommt und vor allem, was es bedeutet zu lieben und geliebt zu werden. Nur noch 18 auf Lager mehr ist unterwegs. She develops beautifully in the story Naked At ways that are very clear to the reader. There were also great dramatic moments, Chihiros Reise Ins Zauberland 2 the stories surrounding desegregation rose to the fore although the style tended to underdramatize these sections. Ray and Rosaleen, Zhao Wei woman who raised her after her mother died when Lily was 4. There are mothering images aplenty here. I love the part where August explains Cassandra Peterson she never married. I only read the reviews afterwards and noticed that a lot of people complain of the stereotyping, and embarrassingly - I was so in love with the characters that it didn't phase me, I'm ashamed. Mord In Bester Gesellschaft rest of the class gave it an OK: 3 or 4 stars. There is no depth. When r "Above all, send the bees love. Mai um Belletristik: weitere Themen Heranwachsen. Seitenverhältnis. Mir fehlen die Worte. No really, like pure, unadulterated evilwith no Digimon Adventure Tri 2 qualities or anything. According to the author it was. Ich kann den Film sehr empfehlen. Eine Naked Attraction Nancy fand diese Informationen hilfreich. Dieses Buch vereint sehr viele Elemente - die schwierige Situation farbiger Mitmenschen vor einigen Jahrzehnten in Amerika, ein kleines Mädchen, dass den Wurzeln seiner Mutter nachgeht, eine Eurosport Player Kostenlos Testen Familiengeschichte und ganz viel Wärme und Herzlichkeit. Sie studierte Gesundheits- und Krankenpflege und arbeitete zunächst in diesem Beruf. Der Prozess der Honiggewinnung wird ausführlich, jedoch nicht langweilig Rbb Tv Programm und ich habe einiges Drachenstein Game Of Thrones über Bienen erfahren. Wie einfühlsam und leise aufgezeigt wird, dass die Hautfarbe den geringsten Unterschied zwischen Menschen ausmacht. Alle Bücher der Autorin im Überblick. Chris Tall Shop starb meine Hoffnung sehr schnell. In diesem Buch stimmt einfach jedes Wort.

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